Steve Dugle, right, and his wife Jeanne were prompted by their son,  Brandon, center, to start Stoney Lonesome Outfitters, an archery store, repair shop and 3-D archery course near Canaan. The husband and wife also work together at Madison Junior High School. The three are photographed here next to one of their 3-D bear targets. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Steve Dugle, right, and his wife Jeanne were prompted by their son, Brandon, center, to start Stoney Lonesome Outfitters, an archery store, repair shop and 3-D archery course near Canaan. The husband and wife also work together at Madison Junior High School. The three are photographed here next to one of their 3-D bear targets. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Barely a month into a new business venture, Steve and Jeanne Dugle are already taking aim at their retirement.

While retiring from Madison Junior High School isn't in their immediate future, the two science teachers say their new business, Stoney Lonesome Outfitters, is what they're hoping to do once they step away from teaching.

"We've got two years to either build it up or give it up," Jeanne Dugle said.

"We're getting to that age where we're trying to think of something else we want to do when we grow up," Steve Dugle said.

The archery range sits on the Dugle's 160 acre farm on U.S. 421 near Canaan, with 30 3-D targets - life-sized foam targets that look like various animals - plotted on an 80-acre course. Steve Dugle described it as being similar to a golf course.

"You go out in groups of four, like golf, and you see who gets the best shot," he said.

Scoring the shots is similar to darts, in that certain areas on the target are worth more than other areas.

The course is made up of 30 different shoots that change every weekend. Archers choose their distance away from the target, based on colored pegs sticking out of the ground, and the farther away you shoot, the more difficult the shot.

"Most people come out and shoot the first 15 and then they come back here and enjoy a snack or a Coke before hitting the last 15," Steve Dugle said.

So far, Stoney Lonesome Outfitters - named after the creek that runs by the back end of the property - has attracted growing groups of people each week, many of whom are repeat customers.

"The first day we opened up, which was five weeks ago, we had 9 paying customers come and shoot the range. Then the next time we opened up, we had 15 and now we've had over 45 each time.

"The cool thing is, we wanted families to come out, so we're getting a lot of wives and husbands. Instead of going and playing golf, they seem to want to come out here," Steve Dugle said.

"It's giving people in our community something to do. Something different. Getting them outdoors to enjoy nature," Jeanne Dugle said.

Blake Jones and Kyle Clerain are two of the Dugle's regular customers. Before Stoney Lonesome Outfitters opened last month, the two were having to drive to Lexington or North Vernon to shoot on a range.

Jones said the terrain of the course is part of what makes it a fun shoot.

"It's not all flat," he said. "You've got to walk through the hills and try to get the best shot at different angles."

Brandon Dugle, Steve and Jeanne's oldest son and partner in the operation, said the course was plotted that way. Part of archery, he said, is not only being able to eyeball a distance, but knowing how to adjust your aim based on the terrain.

Steve Dugle explained that it was actually his son who got the ball rolling on starting a family business.

"Jeanne and I had talked about it and talked about it. Brandon decided if he didn't file the paperwork and get things started, it wasn't going to happen," he said.

"If it wasn't for Brandon, we wouldn't have all this. He showed up and said, 'Here's your business.'"

Soon after registering their business and incorporating, Strother Archery, a bow company, decided to sponsor them.

The father and son archers also found a bow technician course in New York that taught them how to work on all types of archery equipment.

"I walked in thinking I knew a lot," Brandon Dugle said. "I walked out realizing that, now I know a lot."

Together, the family hopes to continue growing the business into something larger.

"It's funny. Having a family business is just like being a family, because you kind of squabble about things, you talk things out, you work things through. But I am so proud of my family for where we're at now. I mean, it's small, but it's ours."

The Dugle's hope to be able to give archery lessons soon. They also repair and adjust bows at their shop.

Stoney Lonesome Outfitters is open from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. They also take appointments.