Niles Bray picks peaches at his Trimble County orchard Thursday before the temperatures hit the mid-90s. The pickers carry frozen water bottles to stay cool.<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->  The Bray family has about 35 acres of peaches and more than 40 varieties, including Harbelle, which Bray picked Thursday. <br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->  “This is about the fifth time we’ve picked them,” he said of the variety.  <br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->  The Brays said this year’s harvest was pushed back at least three weeks because of the wetter weather and cooler ground conditions. But despite the delay, they expect to have a good season. “This here will be a fine crop of peaches,” Bray said. (Staff photo by Steve Dickerson/sdickerson@madisoncourier.com)
Niles Bray picks peaches at his Trimble County orchard Thursday before the temperatures hit the mid-90s. The pickers carry frozen water bottles to stay cool.

The Bray family has about 35 acres of peaches and more than 40 varieties, including Harbelle, which Bray picked Thursday.

“This is about the fifth time we’ve picked them,” he said of the variety.

The Brays said this year’s harvest was pushed back at least three weeks because of the wetter weather and cooler ground conditions. But despite the delay, they expect to have a good season. “This here will be a fine crop of peaches,” Bray said. (Staff photo by Steve Dickerson/sdickerson@madisoncourier.com)
The Courierarea got its first taste of the dog days of summer this week as temperatures consistently hit the mid-90s and humidity was on the rise.

While those digits pale in comparison to last year's persistent heat wave and temperatures are likely to cool off a bit this weekend, residents are warned to proceed with caution while working outdoors and to be aware of heat-related illnesses.

The Indiana Department of Health cautions outdoor workers to drink plenty of fluids, pace themselves, eat lighter meals and include more salads, fresh vegetables and fruit in meals and carry water.

Young children, especially babies, and the elderly are more susceptible to heat-induced illnesses, the health department said, so both need extra care and attention during times of extra heat.

Signs of heat exhaustion include heavy sweating, paleness, tiredness, headache, weakness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and fainting. Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperatures (above 103 degrees); red, hot and dry skin (no sweating); rapid strong pulse; throbbing headache; dizziness; nausea; confusion and unconsciousness, the health department said.