Elizabeth Gee and Clay Brawner pose for a photo for this weekend’s Madison Consolidated High School production of “The Sound of Music.” (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Elizabeth Gee and Clay Brawner pose for a photo for this weekend’s Madison Consolidated High School production of “The Sound of Music.” (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
The halls of Madison Consolidated High School are alive with "The Sound of Music."

The school will present a three-day showing of the famous Rodgers and Hammerstein musical this weekend in the high school auditorium. The production, which will feature more than a 40-person cast and crew and a full orchestra, will be the school's last show of the season and the largest of the year.

The production is being directed by teacher Aaron Kelsey.

Performances will be Friday at 7 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. The running time is two hours and 30 minutes with one intermission.

Prices for students K-12 are $5. Adult admission is $10. All balcony seats are $5. For the Saturday matinee, seniors will get a $2 discount.

The school has presented "The Sound of Music" in the past, but not since Kelsey took over the theater department.

"We wanted to do a classic show that everybody loved," said Melanie Torline, assistant director and Madison Fine Arts Academy instructor.

The production is based on the 1959 musical which was written from the memoir of Maria von Trapp.

The show follows Maria, an Austrian woman who leaves the monastery and becomes a caretaker for seven children in the Trapp family. She quickly brings music back to the Trapp household but finds herself at odds with the strict child-rearing tactics of children's father, Capt. Georg von Trapp.

The pair's opposite personalities eventually attract, but the threat of World War II disrupts and challenges the new family.

Dedicated fans of the 1965 film adaptation starring Julie Andrews should know that the musical offers something new, Torline said.

"There are a lot of songs that aren't in the movie," she said.

Madison students have spent the last two months preparing for the show.

All actors are participating in the show as an extra curricular activity, which means they did not have class time to rehearse. To fill some of the openings for the younger Trapp children, the school opened tryouts for Madison elementary and middle school students.

Torline said she has been impressed with the way the students buckled down to perfect their parts, especially after returning from spring break.

"It's been a crunch at the end to get some of the quirks figured out, but that's part of the fun," she said.