Kay Rohlfing removes a section of carpeting for a staircase that she constructed for a doll house at Girls Inc. Rohlfing, a 2006 Madison Consolidated High School graduate, now lives and works as an artist in Louisville. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie)
Kay Rohlfing removes a section of carpeting for a staircase that she constructed for a doll house at Girls Inc. Rohlfing, a 2006 Madison Consolidated High School graduate, now lives and works as an artist in Louisville. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie)
Creativity runs in the family for one Madison native who opened her own interior construction business recently.

Kay Rohlfing always knew she wanted to create art. Her dad always had a woodworking project going when she was a child, and her mom worked with interior design. Art had been part of her life since she could remember, so it was just natural for her to pursue an art degree in college.

"I don't think I would be where I am if it weren't for them," the 2006 Madison Consolidated High School graduate said. "I always wanted to do art as a career."

Even though Rohlfing does a lot of work on a home's interior, interior design wasn't exactly want she had in mind for a career. Instead, she pursued a degree in studio art that would allow her to do interior design, as well as other artistic work.

"I took as many art classes as I could," Rohlfing said.

After years of making her own unique items, Rohlfing created her own business this year to go along with her artistic talents. After a move from her hometown of Madison, Rohlfing opened Red Crown Designs in Louisville.

The shop features pieces Rohlfing created that can be used throughout the home, such as lamps and decorative paintings. But she enjoys the pieces she creates for children's rooms - like rocking "horses" fashioned to look like a dachshund dog or a sea horse - the most.

The whimsical items allows her to use her artistic style, as well as work with a variety of mediums.

"It's more fun and fits what I do," she said.

She also enjoys creating larger items, such as the animal sculptures that can be used in a child's room or throughout a home.

Even though Rohlfing works mostly in Louisville, she does work in Madison every now and then. One of her recent projects in the area was a built-in doll house for Barbies at the Girls Inc. building on Third Street.

"I had built some doll houses with my dad in the past," Rohlfing said.

Rohlfing first began with measurements of the closet space for the dollhouse styled after Madison's historic homes before putting her ideas to paper in sketches.

It only took a couple of days for her to finish a four-story dollhouse creation at Girls Inc.

"I like to work pretty fast," she said.

Even with plans and sketches, most projects change from the idea in the beginning to the finished project.

"You always run into problems," Rohlfing said.

From small problems of figuring out how to cut pieces to fit just right to larger issues with woodworking or adhesives that might need to be discussed with her parents about how to proceed, Rohlfing simply makes the changes and continues with the project.

"I do all the work on my own," she said, "but I'm always consulting my dad."