Lisa Seng Shadday, above, a Republican candidate for District 66 state representative, speaks with Robin Henderson during a candidate forum at the Old Market on Main on Tuesday. Below, Sharon Daghir, a Republican candidate for the Madison Township trustee, speaks with Eston Smith, a Democratic Party candidate for the Saluda Township Trustee. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Lisa Seng Shadday, above, a Republican candidate for District 66 state representative, speaks with Robin Henderson during a candidate forum at the Old Market on Main on Tuesday. Below, Sharon Daghir, a Republican candidate for the Madison Township trustee, speaks with Eston Smith, a Democratic Party candidate for the Saluda Township Trustee. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Candidates in the May 6 primary election met with the public Tuesday night at a forum hosted by the Madison Area Chamber of Commerce.

Candidates ranging from state to township races shared their concerns for the community and what they would do if elected.

The evening opened with an hour for a candidate meet-and-greet, which was mostly spent with the candidates talking to each other.

Then, each candidate got two minutes to address to the public.

The speeches started with the State Senate race for District 45.

Julie Berry, a Democrat who spent three terms as a Jefferson County Commissioner, said her priorities would be jobs that pay a living wage, stabilizing public education and non-partisan redistricting.

Rick Reuss, speaking on behalf of Republican incumbent Sen. Jim Smith, said Smith favors a smaller, more efficient government and spending the state's money responsibly.

Three Republicans seeking the nomination for state representative in District 66 spoke next.

Ron Harsin, who is seeking his first political office, said he was tired of what he sees in Washington D.C. and the political games being played. Rather than sit on the sidelines, he decided to run for office. His priorities are to bring back jobs and get taxes reduced.

Lisa Seng Shadday said state legislators should act as a defense against Washington D.C. when politicians neglect smaller areas, something she wanted to correct. Shadday said she supports limited government, simplified taxes and property rights.

Joe Van Wye Sr., who unsuccessfully ran for the 6th District Congressional seat in 2012, said he is tired of government getting bigger. He hopes to help create more jobs and a smaller government.

Terry Goodin, the Democratic incumbent in the 66th District, was not in attendance.

Randy Frye, a Republican who is unopposed in the primary for the 67th District, said he plans on continuing to push legislation for natural gas to be used as fuel in vehicles.

Three Democrats seeking the nomination for Superior Court judge explained for why they were the best candidate for the job.

Bill Gray, a Canaan resident who practices in Jeffersonville, said he would bring integrity, honesty and fairness to the court.

Mike Hensley, who has practiced law in Madison for 34 years, said his experience in several areas of law make him the most qualified.

Jeannie Stotts, a Madison native with 15 years of legal experience, said she would make timely rulings and fair decisions if elected.

Republican Alison Frazier, who won the race for Superior Court Judge in 2008, talked about her success with the drug court and community corrections, which she said have saved the county almost $300,000.

Several other candidates who are uncontested in the primary also spoke. More than 30 candidates were in attendance.