“Hanover College does not discourage the free and open debate of ideas, beliefs and opinions. However, we do seek to discourage intolerance of and discrimination against those individuals whose lives do not mirror one’s own, or who do not enjoy the approval of a majority.” Hanover College President <br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Sue DeWine
“Hanover College does not discourage the free and open debate of ideas, beliefs and opinions. However, we do seek to discourage intolerance of and discrimination against those individuals whose lives do not mirror one’s own, or who do not enjoy the approval of a majority.” Hanover College President

Sue DeWine
Hanover College is the latest in a group of college's and universities in Indiana to voice opposition to a gay marriage ban from being amended into the state constitution.

In a written statement, Hanover College President Sue DeWine said that college students are asked to "live by six basic principles when they join this community. One of those principles is 'respect for one another.'"

"Amending the Indiana constitution so as to limit the civil rights and legal protections of particular citizens of the state is unjustifiably discriminatory and therefore inconsistent with the College's stated commitment to promote 'respect for one another.'"

DePauw University and Wabash College announced Monday they are joining a bipartisan group called Freedom Indiana, a grassroots group that includes business leaders, universities, human rights groups and residents united in opposition to the ban.

While DeWine did not state specific support for Freedom Indiana, she went on to voice general support for its effort.

"Hanover College does not discourage the free and open debate of ideas, beliefs and opinions. However, we do seek to discourage intolerance of and discrimination against those individuals whose lives do not mirror one's own, or who do not enjoy the approval of a majority. The attitudes and conduct encouraged by the Hanover principle listed above are essential to the well-being of any community that is respectful of the diversity among its members."

State lawmakers have passed the amendment once. It must pass again in order to go before voters next November.