TOURING THE HANOVER CAMPUS: Hanover College junior Alex Peck answers questions from, left to right, Kaylee Cox, Abby Dargie and Sarah Hornak, while guiding them on a tour of the campus Wednesday. The girls, seniors from Richmond, are visiting colleges before making a decision on where to apply. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
TOURING THE HANOVER CAMPUS: Hanover College junior Alex Peck answers questions from, left to right, Kaylee Cox, Abby Dargie and Sarah Hornak, while guiding them on a tour of the campus Wednesday. The girls, seniors from Richmond, are visiting colleges before making a decision on where to apply. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
With the 2013-2014 school year well under way, high school seniors are beginning to visit potential college campuses.

Chris Gage, dean of admissions at Hanover College, said visits from potential college students tend to come in waves, but that during fall break many students begin the process of checking out campuses.

"This is our busiest time of year, in terms of applicants visiting," he said. "As we transition over to winter, a lot of juniors will start visiting who want to apply."

Abby Dargie, Kaylee Cox and Sarah Hornak, all seniors at Seton Catholic School in Richmond, made the trip to Hanover on Wednesday with their families to tour the campus.

The three students want to attend college together to study pre-medicine.

Their school guidance counselor is a Hanover graduate and recommended they take a campus tour.

"I want a small school," Dargie said. "I think it would be a better fit for me."

Gage said that touring colleges is essential for young people to realize what they want and where they best fit.

"It doesn't have to be stressful," he said. "We try to keep it easy."

Gage said students should do some quick research before scheduling a college visit. That could include anything from a quick Google search to calling the admissions office.

School counselors and admissions officers, he said, might also be able to point them in the right direction for a school that's a good fit for students.

"We always tell people you can never change what college you graduate from," Gage said.