A HINT OF SUNSHINE: The only sunshine at Saturday’s Carroll County Tobacco Festival parade was artificial in the form of a huge sunflower. Parade participants and viewers endured rain - heavy at times - for the annual festival. Heavy rain all weekend forced the cancellation of many events and created flash flood warnings in the Kentuckiana area.  (Staff photo by David Hill)
A HINT OF SUNSHINE: The only sunshine at Saturday’s Carroll County Tobacco Festival parade was artificial in the form of a huge sunflower. Parade participants and viewers endured rain - heavy at times - for the annual festival. Heavy rain all weekend forced the cancellation of many events and created flash flood warnings in the Kentuckiana area. (Staff photo by David Hill)
Dozens of people were displaced over the weekend by flooding in northern Kentucky and southern Indiana, including some by rescue personnel using boats, authorities said Sunday.

The Madison Courier's weather station recorded 4.53 inches of rain on Saturday and Sunday. At times Sunday, the rain was falling at a rate of 7.78 inches an hour.

In Indiana, cars skidded off Interstate 65 after hydroplaning and a woman needed to be rescued from her stalled car on a flooded road Sunday.

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood watch through Sunday night for Jefferson, Clark, Floyd and Scott counties.

Indiana State Police reported some motorists skidded off I-65 on Sunday morning north of Seymour after their vehicles hydroplaned. No injuries were reported and the vehicles were pulled back onto the highway, according to state police from the Versailles post.

Volunteer firefighters waded into water 2 feet deep on Sunday morning south of Corydon and helped a female motorist to safety, conservation officer Jim Hash said.

Responders believed the woman didn't realize how high the water was and thought her compact car could make it through what appeared to be a light ponding area.

"I think the lady got panicked" and caused the car to stall out, Hash said.

By Sunday evening, some people in the Louisville area were returning home to assess damage. Flood watches and warnings were discontinued for the area as the rain tapered off.

A potent storm front rumbling across the nation's midsection was blamed for the rain, Metro Safe spokeswoman Jody Duncan told The Associated Press.

"We had about 82 people that we assisted because of flooding in specific areas," said Duncan, with the local emergency management agency for the city and the county. "We had 12 rescues and 250 assists. Everybody's safe and we had no injuries."

She said most had to be taken from their homes but personnel also helped stalled motorists safely get out of vehicles that had stalled on swamped roads. Several of those evacuated took shelter in a high school and others in a church.

Anya Hopper told The Courier-Journal that she fled their one-story home with her husband, Wes, their 6-year-old son, Braeden, and their pets, and waited in the back of one of their sport utility vehicles until firefighters rescued them in an inflatable boat late Saturday night.

"Both of our cars are under water. ... Our house is flooded," said Hopper, one of about 20 flood victims taking shelter at Atherton High School on Sunday. "We're all OK; that's the important thing."

Jenny Pluta is a volunteer with the American Red Cross, which is running the shelter. She said around 25 people had registered between the time they opened in the early-morning hours on Sunday and around 8 a.m., although some stayed for a few hours and left. Pluta expected more people to seek shelter on Sunday.

Duncan said waters had receded somewhat in the early hours Sunday when rain lightened up.

Nevertheless, she said the large St. James Court Art Show that started Friday in Louisville was shut down around 5 p.m. Saturday and was canceled Sunday, what would have been the last day of the event.

The drenching rainstorms were part of a cold front sweeping the area late Saturday, prompting flash flood warnings for more than two dozen counties in and around Louisville and parts of southern Indiana. Some of the watches remained in effect early Sunday.