Pearl White, from left, Debbie Cross, Tammy Oakley, Jeff Melton, Julie Epperson and Teresa Bounds learn to operate heart monitor screens during a nurse training day at the new King’s Daughters’ Hospital on Monday. The hospital is scheduled to open Feb. 23. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Pearl White, from left, Debbie Cross, Tammy Oakley, Jeff Melton, Julie Epperson and Teresa Bounds learn to operate heart monitor screens during a nurse training day at the new King’s Daughters’ Hospital on Monday. The hospital is scheduled to open Feb. 23. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
King's Daughters' Health will offer some of the newest healthcare technology available when the new hospital opens in less than two weeks. 

The new hospital on State Road 62 will be only one of four hospitals in the United States to utilize the Mobile Heartbeat technology, which allows information to be accessed by nurses and doctors on handheld devices such as the iPhone.

The new technology will allow access to everything from heart monitors to a patient's file.

The Mobile Heartbeat allows nurses and doctors to call or text one another through the hospital's secured WiFi system for a more immediate response than ever before. A camera function will also allow nurses or doctors to document and monitor wounds.

"We want to make the work flow better," he said. 

Instead of waiting for lab results to be sent to a computer at a nursing station, results will be readily available on the mobile devices, Kendall said.

The new technology will also help King's Daughters' Health move toward a completely paperless system, King's Daughters' Health spokesman Dave Ommen said. The Mobile Heartbeat follows all HIPAA standards and is encrypted with more security than locking documents and papers in a room.

No patient information is stored on the devices, and devices are completely cleared once a user logs out of the application or leaves the hospital's secured WiFi network, Mobile Heartbeat project manager James Webb said.

King's Daughters' Health hopes to become a "silent hospital" with the use of the system. Doctors and nurses will be able to directly call or text information to one another instead of relying on a paging system.

The new hospital will also feature other advancements that will help a patient's healing process.

Bariatric lifts are available to help nurses move patients. 

Three bariatric lifts are located throughout the hospital with two on the floors in patient rooms and one in the emergency room. The lifts will be able to hold up to 770 pounds.

No such lifts existed in the downtown hospital. Nurses and doctors used physical manpower to lift patients. The lifts will add convenience for doctors and nurses - and for patients as well.

Several other new technologies in the five surgery suites and heart catheterization lab will also allow more procedures to be performed in Madison.

Inserting stents and dialysis ports and other heart procedures will become in-house services provided at KDH because of the new technology.

And, the hospital was designed to accommodate future technology. The hospital was built with space in the ceilings and in the rooms for emerging and new technology, Ommen said.

King's Daughters' Health will host a community open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Tours of the new facility will be held, as well as a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 1:30 p.m.