Elsie Perry-Payne, left, and Shirley Kloepfer dish out greens, macaroni and cheese and other dishes to Peggy Attenberger at the soul food luncheon at the African Methodist Episcopal Church Building on Sunday.  (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Elsie Perry-Payne, left, and Shirley Kloepfer dish out greens, macaroni and cheese and other dishes to Peggy Attenberger at the soul food luncheon at the African Methodist Episcopal Church Building on Sunday. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Grace Humes shared the history of soul food during a Black History Month event at the African Methodist Episcopal Church on Sunday.

The event included a soul food luncheon and the viewing of the PBS documentary "Slavery by Another Name."

Humes talked about how many of the recipes for the food being served came from black families who, as slaves, made the best of what they were given to eat - usually the parts of the animals and vegetables that the slave owners didn't want.

Those recipes have been passed down for generations, Humes said, and are an important part of the heritage and identity of the black culture.

The documentary, "Slavery by Another Name," was based on the book of the same name by Douglas Blackmon. The film told how, even as slavery came to an official end after the Civil War, a new system of involuntary servitude took its place.

The movie documented how, for more than eight decades, thousands of innocent black men and women were arrested and forced to work without pay for a new set of white masters. The movie will be presented again on Saturday, July 19, at 3 p.m. as part of the Eleutherian College "Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle" educational and cultural program. More information about the Created Equal program schedule can be found at the News & Events link at www.eleutheriancollege.org.