Crystal Beach lifeguards, left to right, Giann Bennett, Paige Hess, Patric Guy, Annie Lynch and Kinsey Mahoney have all been involved with at least one save already this summer. Hannah Lohr, not pictured, has also made a save. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie / kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Crystal Beach lifeguards, left to right, Giann Bennett, Paige Hess, Patric Guy, Annie Lynch and Kinsey Mahoney have all been involved with at least one save already this summer. Hannah Lohr, not pictured, has also made a save. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie / kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Lifeguards at Crystal Beach Pool have been tested several times since the pool opened earlier this month.

So far, six of the pool's 18 lifeguards have had to help a struggling swimmer to safety.

Those six lifeguards have helped one another perform four saves since the pool opened Memorial Day weekend.

Kathy Potter, pool manager, said in past summers they have averaged between four and six saves total.

Potter said one of the keys to being a lifeguard is acting without hesitation.

"We'd rather have them go in and find it wasn't necessary than hesitate," she said.

Hannah Lohr, head lifeguard and safety instructor at Crystal Beach, said she had to make a save within the first week of the pool's opening.

Two children were swimming together, Lohr said, when the weaker swimmer of the two started to struggle and pull the other child down into the water.

Lohr dove in and got both children to safety.

"It's an adrenaline rush," Lohr said.

All of Crystal Beach's lifeguards have to be at least 16 years old and have gone through lifeguard training before they interview.

Lifeguard Patric Guy said once you see a struggling swimmer, the lifeguard training takes over.

"It's like instinct," Guy said. "Nothing is going through your head at the time, you're just reacting."

Guy has been involved in one save this year and three last year.

"They stick with you. It's tough settling down after. You think about it a lot," he said.

Lifeguards at Crystal Beach also teach morning and evening swim lessons. Annie Lynch, another lifeguard to make a save this summer, said it makes her want to be sure the basics of swimming safety get covered.

"It makes me want to go over safety topics more," she said.

Potter said most of the safety topics they go over at the pool are "common sense" things. But "common sense" is easily forgotten when panic sets in.

Yelling for help and not pulling on a lifeguard when they come to you are probably the biggest things to remember while you're in the water, Potter said.

But there are things people should do before entering the pool. Potter and Lohr said swimmers should feel free to ask guards about the pool and where the deep ends are.

"Most of (the saves) have been because people don't realize how deep the pool gets in certain spots and they start to panic," Potter said.

Staying hydrated, knowing your limitations as a swimmer and using sunscreen are also advised to those getting in the water this summer.