KDH DOWNTOWN SERVICES REMAIN: Many services offered by King’s Daughters’ Health will remain downtown after the new hospital opens on the hilltop Saturday morning.  Doctors’ offices in the downtown Medical Building, the Cancer Center and business offices will not move. The Cancer Center is expected to eventually be relocated at the new hospital campus. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
KDH DOWNTOWN SERVICES REMAIN: Many services offered by King’s Daughters’ Health will remain downtown after the new hospital opens on the hilltop Saturday morning. Doctors’ offices in the downtown Medical Building, the Cancer Center and business offices will not move. The Cancer Center is expected to eventually be relocated at the new hospital campus. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Many medical services will change locations over the next few weeks as King's Daughters' Health transitions from the downtown hospital to the new KDH campus on Madison's hilltop.

Yet, more than 150 KDH employees - almost 20 percent of the workforce - will remain downtown after the hospital's move to the new facility on State Road 62, spokesman Dave Ommen said.

The new hospital opens Saturday. Doctors' offices plan to move to their new spaces in the main campus Medical Building on March 2, and doctors will begin to see patients at the new campus March 4.

Doctors Roy Miner, Scott Murphy, John Hossler, Mark Totten, and Sarah Marshall and nurse practitioner Vikki Conners will have offices on the second floor of the Downtown Medical Building. Doctor Steve Adams will also move to the downtown building in April.

The Downtown Medical Building will also provide X-ray imaging and laboratory services and serve as the home to the King's Daughters' Foundation.

The Cancer Treatment Center and EMS services will stay downtown until new facilities are completed at the main campus

Plans for a cancer center near the main campus Medical Building are already in development, but the downtown center will remain open for medical and radiation oncology until the new center is ready. The hilltop cancer center is projected to open sometime in 2014.

Patients participating in sleep studies will continue to use the Sleep Lab facility on Fifth Street. The Business Office will also remain downtown at the corner of Broadway and Fifth Street.

The marketing and community relations department will move to space next to the EMS ambulance garage on West Street.

The materials warehouse on Milton Street will continue to serve the downtown medical building, sleep lab and other medical offices that remain downtown.

King's Daughters' Health will also retain ownership of the downtown parking garage, Ommen said. King's Daughters' Health plans to lease the top three floors of the garage to Trilogy Health Services, which purchased part of the downtown campus - including the hospital building and other buildings on Presbyterian Avenue - for $1. Trilogy will take possession of the property on April 1.

Trilogy plans a $3 to $4 million renovation for the downtown hospital building after taking possession of the property to convert the space into a senior living facility. Nearly 120 new jobs will be added once the Trilogy facility opens in 2014.