Trimble County High School students, from left, Elisabeth Moore, Sidney Gossom and Hannah Gordon work on a  mural that will be near Crystal Beach Swimming Pool. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie)
Trimble County High School students, from left, Elisabeth Moore, Sidney Gossom and Hannah Gordon work on a mural that will be near Crystal Beach Swimming Pool. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie)
The first lines have been drawn to mark the start of a six-month endeavor by high school and college art students in two states to depict 70 years of life in Madison on a 107-foot-long mural.

The mural, on the corrugated metal side of a shed owned by Historic Madison Inc. and easily seen from Crystal Beach swimming pool, will be full of Madison icons, scenes and lifestyle symbols spanning the years from when Crystal Beach opened in 1939 until the city's Bicentennial in 2009. The mural is a Bicentennial project.

Pictures on the mural will have meaning for young and old.

"I'm most excited about putting in the (Ohio) Theatre. That's where I work," said Hannah Gordon, a senior at Trimble County High School and one of the three students starting work on the wall Wednesday.

Students and art club members from Trimble County in Kentucky and from Madison Consolidated and Southwestern high schools and Hanover College will be working on the mural until late next May.

Swimsuit styles and automobiles through the decades will be depicted, as will the submarine that was in a parade in Madison in the 1940s, the iconic Broadway Fountain and Hinkle's, the Bicentennial and the Courthouse fire, basketball and boat racing prizes, Ribberfest, the Lanier Mansion and the flood-destroyed flour mill that was salvaged to build Crystal Beach.

Two well-known Madisonians who worked at Crystal Beach and later were important in the development of sports in Madison - Mary Louise Eisenhardt and Peewee Lakeman - will be in the mural, too.

Trimble art teacher Bonnie Peugeot, who lives in Madison and was a lifeguard at Crystal Beach in her younger years, is spearheading the project.

Peugeot said she has never heard of a project involving so many high schools and a college spanning two states.

"I want the kids to understand they are making history as they draw history," she said.

The students drew scenes on clear sheets, which will be projected onto the wall so they can be traced, then painted. Peugeot said they will paint one color at a time, using house paint. At the end, artist acrylic paints will be used for highlights, and then the entire mural will be covered with a clear sealant.

The deadline is to finish before Crystal Beach opens next Memorial Day weekend. Painting will depend on the weather.