Carroll County High School teacher Ben Crutcher receives a pin from Drill Instructor Sgt. Phillip Campas while CCHS teacher Daniel McCrocklin looks on. The presentation ceremony is similar to when recruits receive their Marine Corps Eagle, Globe and Anchor from their drill instructors and are called “Marine” for the first time. Campas was Crutcher’s and McCrocklin’s drill instructor for the Marine Corps Educator Workshop. (Marine Corps photos by Sgt. Daniel Angel/Released)
Carroll County High School teacher Ben Crutcher receives a pin from Drill Instructor Sgt. Phillip Campas while CCHS teacher Daniel McCrocklin looks on. The presentation ceremony is similar to when recruits receive their Marine Corps Eagle, Globe and Anchor from their drill instructors and are called “Marine” for the first time. Campas was Crutcher’s and McCrocklin’s drill instructor for the Marine Corps Educator Workshop. (Marine Corps photos by Sgt. Daniel Angel/Released)
Two Carroll County High School teachers experienced first-hand what it's like to train in the Marine Corps.

Ben Crutcher and Daniel McCrocklin participated in the Marine Corps Educator Workshop, a four-day training experience for educators. The program gives teachers an overview of the Marine Corps basic training regiment at the training camp at Parris Island, S.C.

The two teachers traveled to South Carolina for the workshop, which was held Dec. 3-6.

The workshop is held once a year for teachers, principals and guidance counselors, Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Daniel Angel said. While there, educators are drilled over some of the boot camp basics.

"It was a four-day whirlwind," McCrocklin said in a release. "The Marines definitely push the recruits mentally, physically and emotionally."

Angel said the idea behind the workshop is to give educators the opportunity to see what boot camp is like for recruits.

"If the educators have students who are interested in joining the Marine Corps, they will be able to speak about it from their own experiences of what they saw at Parris Island," Angel said.

The workshop is held once a year with 27 educators from schools within the Marine Corps Recruiting Station Louisville's area.

Between simulated experiences of the workshop's boot camp, drill instructors answer questions from the educators.

"The Marines told us that young people who are interested in the military should first speak with their parents," Crutcher said. "Then, they should look at all of the military branches to see which will be the best fit for them."

At the end of the four-day workshop, the educators saw a class of recruits go through their graduation ceremony.

"We got to see kids graduate who had dedicated themselves to 13 intense weeks of training," Crutcher said. "They had undergone a transformation in that time."