Todd Schmiedeler, vice president of community outreach for Tiology Health Services, discusses the company's plan to give the furniture and shelving in the former King's Daughters' Hospital building to the Habitat ReStore. (Staff photo by Evan Shields/eshields@madisoncourier.com)
Todd Schmiedeler, vice president of community outreach for Tiology Health Services, discusses the company's plan to give the furniture and shelving in the former King's Daughters' Hospital building to the Habitat ReStore. (Staff photo by Evan Shields/eshields@madisoncourier.com)
Volunteers cleared out reusable items this week that had been left behind after the move from the former King's Daughters' Hospital building in downtown Madison.

Nearly 27 handwritten pages of items had been left behind after the hospital's move in February, Trilogy Health Services' Senior Vice President of Recruitment, Foundation and Community Outreach Todd Schmiedeler said.

The items included cabinetry, chairs, desks and tables, that had been left for the new owners once the property was transferred to Trilogy.

"Frankly, one person's burden ... is another person's blessing," Schmiedeler said.

The company partnered with the Jefferson County Habitat for Humanity ReStore to make sure as much of the inventory finds a home in a place other than a local landfill, he said.

On Friday, Habitat volunteers moved items, including laundry bins, chairs, couches, clocks, and large picture frames, to the ReStore at 931 Lanier Drive.

The items will be used to keep the ReStore stocked with merchandise for quite a while, Jefferson County Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Amy Ray said.

"What Trilogy has done is allow us long-term sustainability," Ray said.

Schmiedeler said Trilogy likes to align with community groups with similar values, or servant-leader-based companies.

"You don't get these situations very often," Schmiedeler said, which he described it as a win-win.

Yet, with a "win" situation comes lots of work. Volunteers pulled cabinetry from the walls, and certified electricians and plumbers volunteered to take off electrical and plumbing fixtures for the ReStore.

Trilogy also hopes to partner with Supplies Over Seas - a Louisville-based nonprofit that collects and distributes surplus medical supplies and equipment to medically-impoverished communities around the world.

Supplies Over Seas should be able to refurbish and redistribute some of the surgical pieces, which Schmiedeler estimated to be worth up to $50,000 each.

Some of the surgical and medical equipment left behind may be outdated by U.S. standards, Schmiedeler said, but the equipment could be a major advancement in impoverished countries without modern health services.

Beginning in August, Trilogy plans to bring in construction crews to renovate the entire five-floor building to create space for a senior living community.

"It will look nothing like this," Schmiedeler said of the building. "Normally, we build our own campus from the ground up."

The renovations will include removing most interior walls and flooring to make space for skilled-nursing rooms, assisted-living rooms and independent living apartments in the community.

Still, the company is taking the project one step at a time right now.

"Not getting those (items) in a landfill makes me happy," Schmiedeler said.