Marshall Wentworth of Jefferson Post 9 of the American Legion (above), retires the colors at the end of the Memorial Day service at the Indiana Veterans Memorial Cemetery on Monday. At the Trimble County Courthouse on Monday, Philip Overmyer, below, says the pledge of allegiance. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie)
Marshall Wentworth of Jefferson Post 9 of the American Legion (above), retires the colors at the end of the Memorial Day service at the Indiana Veterans Memorial Cemetery on Monday. At the Trimble County Courthouse on Monday, Philip Overmyer, below, says the pledge of allegiance. (Staff photos by Ken Ritchie)
Local communities took time for two separate memorial services on Memorial Day to honor the men and women who have died in battle.

Ceremonies were held in Bedford, Ky., at the Trimble County Courthouse square, and in Madison at the Indiana Veterans Memorial Cemetery.

At both ceremonies, the importance of freedoms provided to Americans were expressed.

"But I want you to understand that this freedom isn't free," said the Rev. Tom Starks, who spoke at the Trimble County service. "It cost the blood of 1.3 million people." That death toll since World War I, Starks said, is 130 times larger than the population of Trimble County.

Of the 1.3 million people who have died, 35 came from Trimble County, and all their names were read off at the service.

There were 124 people from Jefferson County who were remembered during the service at the veterans cemetery. Those deaths spanned from as early as World War I to as recent as the Iraq War.

"Yet despite what some people think, peace and safety is not something we can hope for," Starks said. "Sometimes you have to step to the plate of sacrifice."

After the opening prayer at the Bedford service, the Trimble Men's Choir sang patriotic songs for the crowd of about 60 people. Wreaths were placed around the war memorial at the Courthouse square.

The ceremony in Madison was attended by about 150 people. U.S. Rep. Todd Young, R-Ind., was scheduled to speak at the event, but was not in attendance.

Young sent a letter to be read at the ceremony. In it, Young said the people who gave their lives had a special quality.

"It's the willingness of each generation to fight to defend our liberties," Young said in the letter.

The keynote speaker at Madison's event was Brig. Gen. Corey Carr. He said this is an important time to honor not only those who have given their lives in battle, but also to those who are missing.

"Those were ordinary men and women who rose to meet extraordinary odds and do extraordinary things," he said.