The Carolina Chocolate Drops aren't something you eat ... but their sounds are a delicious combination of old-time fiddle and banjo-based music.

The group will be among the performers at this year's RiverRoots Music and Folk Arts Festival on May 17-18.

The festival, in its ninth year, is a few weeks away, but the deadline is approaching to purchase tickets that include free food tickets.

Tickets bought before midnight April 30 will include $10 for food and beverage purchases. After April 30, tickets will remain at $25, but the food tickets will not be included.

For tickets information and a full list of performers, activities and show times go to www.RiverRoots.org, or call 800-559-2956.

With the addition of a second stage there will be continuous music this year. There is also a Folk Village Jam Tent where festival-goers can join the Folk Jammers and make their own music. 

The Carolina Chocolate Drops won the Best Traditional Folk Album Grammy with their old-time music. They dip into styles of Southern black music from the 1920s and '30s - string-band music, jug-band music, fife and drum, and early jazz. Their 2011 visit to the Jam Tent for a workshop was one of the highlights of that year's festival.

One performer many from this area are familiar with also will be on stage. Madison's Andrea Davidson will bring her distinct musical style to the festival again this year.

If it's Cajun-style music you like, you won't want to miss Balfa Toujours. The group's leader, Christine Balfa, is the daughter of great Cajun fiddler Dewey Balfa.

Also back this year is Louisville-based Appalatin. Their members are a mix of musicians from Central America and the Hazard, Ky. area. Their music is a blend of Latin music and Appalachian folk music.

There so much more. A story on the Ticket Page of today's Courier has more information, and the festival's website has more profiles of the entertainers.

RiverRoots has grown since it began nine years ago. If you haven't attended in the past, head down to Bicentennial Park for a foot-stompin' good time. '