Representatives from several local STEM-related industry leaders and employers participated in this year’s STEM roundtable event at Shawe Memorial Jr./Sr. High School on Friday. They watched student presentations and demonstrations, asked questions about the projects and the students’ processes and offered advice or solutions to different challenges the students faced. Students in grades 8 to 12 participated in this year’s demonstrations.  (Courier staff photos by Tali Hunt)
Representatives from several local STEM-related industry leaders and employers participated in this year’s STEM roundtable event at Shawe Memorial Jr./Sr. High School on Friday. They watched student presentations and demonstrations, asked questions about the projects and the students’ processes and offered advice or solutions to different challenges the students faced. Students in grades 8 to 12 participated in this year’s demonstrations. (Courier staff photos by Tali Hunt)
Members from local industry watched student presentations and demonstrations Friday at this year’s annual STEM roundtable at Shawe Memorial Jr./Sr. High School.

Students in grades 8 to 12 participated in this year’s demonstrations. Their topics were Tiny Houses and Inventor Pieces, Gene Therapy, Scratch and Python Programs, Programmed Audrino Bo-Bot with Arena and Programmed Raspberry Pi, Chemistry in Power Production and Prototype of Wheelchair/Walker Conversion.

Throughout the presentations, students talked about the process they experienced with their project — successes and failures and lessons learned for the future. The industry representatives asked questions about processes and sometimes offered advice for the students for the future.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and schools are offering more courses with these focuses to help prepare students for STEM-related careers.

Shawe’s program for the roundtable stated:

“STEM education creates critical thinkers, increases science literacy, and enables the next generation of innovators. Innovation leads to new products and processes that sustain our economy. This innovation and science literacy depends on a solid knowledge base in the STEM areas. It is clear that most jobs of the future will require a basic understanding of math and science. Ten-year employment projections by the U.S. Department of Labor show that of the 20 fastest growing occpuations projected for 2017, 15 of them require significant mathematics or science preparation.”