The Greiner Art Gallery’s current display features the work of Jason S. Brown, Brian R. Jobe, David L. Jones, Patrick Kikut and Shelby Shadwell. Kikut’s watercolor and graphite on paper, “Kansas—Mt. Sunflower,” (right) and Shadwell’s charcoal on paper pieces (above) are among those on exhibit. (Staff photos by Renee Bruck)
The Greiner Art Gallery’s current display features the work of Jason S. Brown, Brian R. Jobe, David L. Jones, Patrick Kikut and Shelby Shadwell. Kikut’s watercolor and graphite on paper, “Kansas—Mt. Sunflower,” (right) and Shadwell’s charcoal on paper pieces (above) are among those on exhibit. (Staff photos by Renee Bruck)

In today's plastic and metal world, people can sometimes overlook the beauty of nature. They forget about a crisp wind through green leaves. They forget about ocean waves or the sound of crickets at night.



Some people, however, champion environmental and conservation efforts, and a few share their passion through the arts.



A warm glow of this hope can be seen at Hanover College's Greiner Art Gallery exhibition, "Land Report."



Five artists have submitted works that focus on varying aspects of human interaction with nature, as well as the drawbacks of societal progress. The art draws from a variety of mediums, and often plays with the affects of movement and light.



Artist Patrick Kikut takes the viewer on a journey across America's plains, showing that the mundane flatness can actually display surpising highs and lows. 



Kikut contrasts horizon lines with sharp, precise images of sunflowers, farm fences, and roadside signs to show that one only has to open their eyes to find color in a bland landscape.



Shelby Shadwell uses the play of light and movement to showcase the surreal visions of nighttime life. Heavy charcoal contrasts with stark white paper to create landscapes that make the viewer remember those late night rides where blurred street lights create dreamscapes.



David Jones portrays desert environments with sculpture and stop motion video to put the viewer in a desert landscape. Part of his exhibit is a display of items such as matches designed to put the viewer in a mindset of survival; leaving them thinking "If I were stranded in the desert, could I survive?"



Jason Brown's display of an upturned mountain filled with coal brings upclose the issue of moutaintop removal which plagues many southern states, including the artist's home state of Tennessee.



Brown's work seems to pose the question: is destruction of the natural landscape worth the energy coal provides?



Tying the exhibit together are brick walkways by Brian Jobe. These walkways provide a flow through which the gallery viewer can move in an effort to make the person part of the overall theme.



"Land Report" will available for viewing at the gallery until Feb. 6. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be an artists' presentation on Feb. 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. with some of the artists present and others appearing via Skype.