Rob Marshall (left), owner of the new dealership and Marshall Auto Group, and Chris Gifford, general sales manager. Gifford was sales manager at the dealership when it was Kinman Chevrolet.
Rob Marshall (left), owner of the new dealership and Marshall Auto Group, and Chris Gifford, general sales manager. Gifford was sales manager at the dealership when it was Kinman Chevrolet.
Rob Marshall has spent the better part of his late summer painting, ripping up carpet, rewiring phone lines and getting everything ready for his newest car dealership in Carrollton.

Marshall Chevrolet, formerly Herb Kinman Chevrolet, opened its doors last week for a soft opening and is now selling and servicing used vehicles. Marshall said the community has been “extremely receptive” of the new store.

“We’re excited, we’re really excited,” Marshall said. “I think it’s going to be a great thing and customers are going to get some good deals.” Marshall Auto Group closed on the property on July 29 after General Mortors (GM) Financial seized it through court order from Rebecca Kinman in February.

Kinman had sold over 60 vehicles without telling GM Financial and failed to make a payment for the month of October, prompting GM to sue and seize all of their assets through a writ of possession, as ordered by Carroll County Circuit Court.

The new dealership is Marshall’s fith, adding to two locations in Dry Ridge, one in Crittenden and another in Florence, Kentucky. It was also part of a 12.5-acre land purchase on U.S. 227, which Marshall will eventually use to build additional parking and potentially expand the facility, he said.

Other than than the buildings, customers can expect a “brand new facility,” Marshall said. Office space in the front has been rearranged to make space for classic cars on display, like Marshall’s own 1969 Corvette Stingray and 1960 Chevrolet pickup truck. Other areas, like the service shop, have seen the flooring refinished and an updated paint job to brighten up the appearance.

When Marshall took ownership, they inherited a cache of unused car parts and accessories, like bumpers, tires and lift kits. Customers can expect a sale at prices as low as one third of the original cost, he said.

Most of the remaining tools, equipment and supplies from Kinman will stay, however, as most are in good condition, he said.

Their initial goal for the first year of business is to sell 60 to 80 cars a month, Marshall said. If business continues to go well, he hopes bump that number to 100.

He also said he plans to hire about 18 employees, then expand upon that if needed. Some former employees of Kinman have returned, like Chris Gifford, a former general sales manager.

An inventory of new and used cars has started to trickle and is being kept at the other Marshall dealerships, Marshall said. He expects they’ll all be here by October.

For now, customers can stop by the dealership to browse used cars.