Early voting for today’s Kentucky Primary Election was slow at the Trimble County Courthouse in Bedford, Kentucky, on Monday, but voting machines were standing ready and there was plenty of hand sanitizer on hand to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (Madison Courier staff photo by Collin Overton)
Early voting for today’s Kentucky Primary Election was slow at the Trimble County Courthouse in Bedford, Kentucky, on Monday, but voting machines were standing ready and there was plenty of hand sanitizer on hand to help curb the spread of COVID-19. (Madison Courier staff photo by Collin Overton)
Voters in Trimble County have one last day to vote in this year’s primary election in Kentucky, with polls open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. today at Milton and Bedford Elementary Schools.

County Clerk Tina Browning said between early voting and mail-out ballots, applications for ballots surpassed 1,400 this year, topping the 2012 and 2016 presidential primaries. Monday was the last day of early voting at the Trimble County Courthouse, with over 60 ballots counted by 10 a.m. that morning, Browning said.

A big reason for that, she said, might be that Kentucky has never allowed early voting until the COVID-19 pandemic forced the state to look at new procedures.

“I’ve always thought that if we allowed early voting, more people would vote,” Browning said.

Two Republican candidates from Henry County are running to fill the seat left to be vacated by retiring incumbent 47th District State Rep. Rick Rand (D-Bedford), which covers Trimble, Carroll, Henry and Gallatin Counties. Robert “Bobby” Foree, a seventh-generation farmer and attorney with a law practice in New Castle is running against Angela Rabourn, a younger opponent with experience in the healthcare and financial industries, according to both candidates’ websites.

Rabourn currently serves as the youth chair for the Henry County Republican Party and touts Second Amendment rights and pro-life policies as her major issues, having been endorsed by the anti-abortion group Kentucky Right to Life. She also lists the opioid epidemic, education and transparency on government spending as her major platforms.

Foree is also promising to uphold gun rights, fiscal responsibility and pro-life policies, on top of advocating for social programs for underprivileged youth, infrastructure projects, public/private partnerships for education, addiction resources and a de-polarization of the partisan conflict in Frankfort.

No Democratic candidates are on the ballot for the 47th District.

Two Democrats and one other Republican are vying to unseat 4th Congressional District Rep. Thomas Massie, a libertarian Republican who won control of the northern Kentucky district in 2012. Todd McMurtry is opposing Massie in his first Republican primary, having gained recent attention for representing Covington Catholic High School student Nick Sandmann in a defamation suit against CNN.

The primary race is already shaping up to be one of the most expensive GOP primaries in Kentucky to date, with the Massie campaign spending over $1 million this year and the McMurtry campaign shelling out close to $300,000, according to political analysts.

Democrats Alexandra Ownsby and Shannon Fabert, meanwhile, are also running for the 4th District. Ownsby is a newcomer to politics and aims to increase access to healthcare and education for under-represented voters, having worked as a nurse and single mother in Cincinnati while amassing student loan debt. Fabert is the child of immigrants with a background in operations management and is promising action on climate change, gun control, immigration and foreign policy.

Many eyes will also be focused on the Democratic primary for United States Senator, with Amy McGrath and Charles Booker emerging as the top candidates to challenge incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell in his sixth reelection campaign this November. Eight other candidates are also running for the Democratic ticket and seven Republicans are running to challenge McConnell.

As for the presidential primary, incumbent President Donald Trump is running unopposed while the Democratic race shows 12 candidates. Joe Biden, the presumptive candidate for the Democratic ticket since Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders dropped out of the race in April, finally earned enough delegates to claim that nomination earlier this month, the Associated Press reported.

Those voting Tuesday are reminded to bring a photo ID, Browning said.