Madison winemaker and chef Steve Thomas (left) with “A Taste of History” host Chef Walter Staib in an episode filmed at the historic Locust Grove Home in Louisville. The PBS program is currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Madison winemaker and chef Steve Thomas (left) with “A Taste of History” host Chef Walter Staib in an episode filmed at the historic Locust Grove Home in Louisville. The PBS program is currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
A Madison winemaker and chef is currently featured on one of the most popular cooking programs on television in an episode related to 18th century cooking filmed at the historic Locust Grove Home in Louisville.

Steve Thomas, owner of Thomas Family Winery, prepared four traditional Colonial era recipes in cast iron over the open fire hearth of the Locust Grove Kitchen House for Episode 8 of Season 11 of “A Taste of History” with Emmy Award-winning chef Walter Staib.

Thomas, who appeared on the 25-minute show with his wife, Elizabeth, in period clothing and using period cookware and techniques, prepared Kentucky Burgoo with jowl bacon and wild game including squirrel, Chicken Leek Pie, Corn Soup with Okra and Bourbon Peach Slump Cake. He also used two of the wines he produces at Thomas Family Winery during the episode, a Spanish red in the Burgoo and a Sack as a toast after the slump cake.

Thomas said it was a “an honor” to appear on the show and prepare recipes from the 18th century using cookware and techniques from that period.

While preparing one dish, Thomas also gave a shout out to another Madison craftsman, noting the utensil he was using to grate nutmeg and cinnamon was made by Pat Cunningham, a maker of tinware in Madison whom he said is the last person who still makes tin articles dipped in lamb fat.

A Taste of History with Chef Walter Staib is available on PBS but is also currently streaming on Amazon Prime.