Local state representative Rick Rand commends Trimble County residents for voicing their concerns and thanks Division of Waste Management officials for taking the time to answer questions.
Local state representative Rick Rand commends Trimble County residents for voicing their concerns and thanks Division of Waste Management officials for taking the time to answer questions.
" “We aren’t done, because this was a shot over the bow,” Penny Pennybaker said. “This was our first warning sign of ‘You know what....’” "
UPDATE: The Trimble County Fiscal court voted Friday afternoon to table action on a decision to repeal zoning in the county. Magistrates in favor of zoning wanted to give the Planning and Zoning Commission more time to work on the ordinance that addresses residential and agricultural zones. The Planning and Zoning Commission will meet at an undetermined date. Fiscal Court meets again on Aug.19.



Land use applications for a sludge farm in Trimble County have been pulled, but there is no way to guarantee R & R Septic & Excavation LLC won’t apply again, representatives from the Kentucky Division of Waste Management told area residents Thursday night.

An estimated 250 to 300 Trimble Countians wearing their green “ban sludge” shirts packed the bleachers of Bedford Elementary as representatives from the Waste Management Division heard their questions and concerns. The meeting was originally scheduled to be a public hearing Thursday night, but that meeting was cancelled in light of R & R pulling its application.

Many residents said they feared this wasn’t the end of the issue because R & R still owns the land. Trimble resident and anti-sludge organizer Penny Pennybaker said it says something bigger about the county as a “dumping ground.”

“We aren’t done, because this was a shot over the bow,” Pennybaker said. “This was our first warning sign of ‘You know what, this is going to be another Valley View (Landfill) situation’ where we are only known as a dump site…it opens the door, because the property is cheap, the taxes are cheap; it’s like the perfect breeding ground for the monsters to come out of the woodwork.”

Trimble County resident Stacey Burkhardt posted a note about noon Wednesday on a Facebook page called Ban Sludge in Trimble County!, which had gained almost 900 followers.

The note was from Jamie Nielsen of the Kentucky Division of Wildlife Management. It said in part, “Yesterday afternoon, the Division of Waste Management (DWM) received correspondence from Mr. Robert Olds. He voluntarily requested the withdrawal of the two landfarming permit modifications currently under review by the DWM associated with AI 128929. Attached is the withdraw approval letter issued this morning. Please forward this email to any interested parties.”

The 270-acre site located between Milton and Bedford was going to be used for waste from TreeHouse Foods Inc., an Oldham County maker of jams, jellies and salsa. R and R had originally planned the facility for Henry County, where the company already operates a disposal facility, but Henry’s zoning board declined.

Residents had voiced their opposition to the farm all summer, saying it could have negative environmental and health consequences. Worries about soil contamination, proximity to residential areas and foul smells prompted them to attend the related meetings, share research on the effects of sludge and make t-shirts and yard signs.

While R & R’s withdrawal implies no sludge farm in Trimble County, the company still owns the property off McKinney Farm Road. A spokesperson at the Division of Waste Management said R & R could resubmit requests.