NCAA CHAMP: Arizona State’s Bubba Jenkins (left) poses after beating Penn State’s David Taylor in their 157-pound finals match, Saturday at the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships in Philadelphia. Jenkins got his start in wrestling while living in Madison and competing at Lide White. (AP Photo by Matt Slocum)
NCAA CHAMP: Arizona State’s Bubba Jenkins (left) poses after beating Penn State’s David Taylor in their 157-pound finals match, Saturday at the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships in Philadelphia. Jenkins got his start in wrestling while living in Madison and competing at Lide White. (AP Photo by Matt Slocum)
Former Madisonian Bubba Jenkins may not have been good enough to wrestle for Penn State coach Cael Sanderson but he was good enough to beat Sanderson's brightest star Saturday - and win an NCAA Division I championship in the process.

Jenkins, who got his start in wrestling at the Lide White Boys & Girls Club here, beat Penn State's previously unbeaten redshirt freshman standout David Taylor at 157 pounds in the finals of the NCAA Division I Wrestling tournament Saturday in Philadelphia.

Wrestling for Arizona State after competing his first three seasons for the Nittany Lions, Jenkins pinned Taylor in 4:14 for the only pin of the finals. The victory was personal for Jenkins, who had wanted to finish his collegiate career at Penn State, but left for Arizona State after his relationship with Sanderson soured when the former Iowa standout took over as the Nittany Lions' head coach in 2009-10.

"He didn't think I was good enough or the right kid to win it at that weight class or any weight class," Jenkins recalled Saturday. "I wanted to go 149. But he had other ideas. And he got rid of me. And one man's trash is a whole country's treasure," Jenkins added.

Jenkins' credentials were solid well before Sanderson's arrival. He came to PSU as a former Virginia state champion out of Cox High School in Virginia Beach and then was the NCAA national runner-up in 2008 as a sophomore for the Nittany Lions.

But things changed with the arrival of Sanderson, one of the most highly decorated wrestlers in history with a perfect 159-0 record and four national championships while wrestling for powerhouse Iowa.

Sanderson brought along his younger brother - Cyler, who happened to wrestle in the same weight class as Jenkins - to Penn State. Sanderson then signed Taylor, a four-time state champion in Ohio with a 218-2 record over the last five seasons and a goal of repeating coach Sanderson's feat of winning a national championship all four years.

Sanderson said he and Jenkins parted ways because Jenkins failed to follow team rules. "... it's nothing personal. He's a great kid and I'm happy for him," Sanderson said.

At the same time, Sanderson mandated at the time of Jenkins' transfer that the senior-to-be would be forbidden to wrestle for another Big Ten school and the NCAA mandated that he sit out a year.

Arizona State, where former Cox High School star Brian Stith is an assistant coach, filled that bill so Jenkins headed west to the Sun Devils.

On Saturday, Penn State won it's first NCAA team wrestling championship, but Jenkins got his revenge and then some by spoiling the Lions' quest for a 157-pound title by claiming that for Arizona State.

Jenkins and Taylor were locked in a scoreless tie after one period. In the second, Taylor chose down and escaped four seconds in to take a 1-0 lead. After a scramble, Jenkins locked Taylor up in a cradle, flipped him to his back and pinned the Nittany Lion redshirt freshman, giving Jenkins the crown with a fall in 4:41.

"I definitely feel like I was underrated. They always underrate me. I guess since I moved West and got a tan, they forgot about me and didn't think I was going to be back," Jenkins said. "The tournament was in Philly, I was coming back to PA, and it wasn't just to see the sights and reminisce with old friends. I was coming to win it. I showed up here tonight in a business suit, told my mom, 'Bring my business suit. I don't want to wrestle, I don't want to show up in my wrestler wrestling gear.' It's what I came for. I spent five hours on a flight for a business trip. And I went out there and handled my business."

Jenkins moved to Madison and began his wrestling career as a fourth grader at the Lide White Boys & Girls Club where he wrestled for the Little League and Club Madison programs that have helped produce more than 500 individual state champions.

Jenkins' grandparents, aunts, uncles and nephews are all from the Madison area. Jenkins mother, Teresa, moved to Madison for family support after Bubba's father passed away before later getting a job in Virginia Beach. While Jenkins wrestled in grade school in Madison, he wrestled in junior high and high school in Virginia.

Wit the win, Jenkins becomes just the fourth wrestler in NCAA history to reach the final of a weight class for two different schools. Each of the others won at least one title in their career, either before or after transferring.

Jenkins now plans to turn his focus to the professional ranks and try his hand at Mixed Martial Arts.

"MMA is next. The camera's going to love me," Jenkins said Saturday. "I don't have a face for radio."